Online Betting > Sports News > South African World Cup instills new Hope in its people's Hearts

South African World Cup instills new Hope in its people's Hearts

The June 24, 2010, By Harley Reid

All through history, humans have enjoyed kicking a ball, or something like a ball. Kicking something, in any case. According to historical references, early balls were made of stitched hides, human skulls or pig and cow bladders. ; South African World Cup instills new Hope in its people's Hearts

During the T’sin and Han dynasties in China, a game was played that was called “tsu chu” in which animan skin balls to dribbles to gaps in a net stretched between two posts. The ancient Egyptians had a similar game, while the Greeks and Romans had a game that was more similar to American football, and which entailed both kicking and carrying the ball. However, it was during the 1800s that Charles Goodyear designed and patented the vulcanized rubber ball. The rest, as they say, is history; football became the most played game in the world.

The 2010 South Africa World Cup represents a great turning point for FIFA. For the first time, the greatest even in football is played in Africa, and the excitement and drama of a regular World Cup, together with the awe inspiring beauty of the African continent are irresistible magnets to millions of fans from every corner of the globe. South Africans see this event as a gateway to tourism on a greater scale.

The 2010 World Cup is en event that could completely transform the African continent from end to end. The rest of the world sees Africa as poverty stricken, war torn and disease ridden. For the African players in the World Cup, the event means more than it does to their counterparts from other continents. In football, they get lost amid the colors and flags of a multitude of nations, they forget that most of their countrymen live on roughly two dollars a day, and forget the raging tuberculosis and HIV ravaging their lands.



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